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  1. #26
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    NO im 100% positive the tiles are beryllium. Back in the 90s now they are a hybrid material with small amounts of beryllium in them. the melting point of beryllium is 1278c
    Last edited by 600whp S4; 12-27-2010 at 05:48 PM.

  2. #27
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    If the space shuttle had beryllium stacked on top of something with a low emissivity, wouldn't that trap/reflect the heat back into the beryllium and allow it to travel outwards towards space?

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 600whp S4 Click here to enlarge
    NO im 100% positive the tiles are beryllium.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_S...tection_system

    I could not find anywhere where it says the tiles are made of beryllium. It would be hard to do that since beryllium conducts heat as fast as aluminum, it would be a disaster if they used that type of material. Can you show me a document that says those tiles are made of beryllium?
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  4. #29
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    Also they use it for the brakes on the space shuttle and internal structure pieces in the raft as well

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by SlicktopTTZ Click here to enlarge
    If the space shuttle had beryllium stacked on top of something with a low emissivity, wouldn't that trap/reflect the heat back into the beryllium and allow it to travel outwards towards space?
    Not to get off-topic. But emissivity is a function of the body color (mostly). Thermal conductivity is a material property.

    Thermal conductivity is the ability for a material to move heat PER UNIT LENGTH PER DEGREE CELSIUS (or whatever temperature units you use). So it is units of Watt/m-k. Basically I would have to go back to college and relearn everything about my profession if they really did use solid beryllium for the thermal tiles on the shuttle.

    Not trying to start a war, but physically, it is detrimental to the shuttle if they were to use solid beryllium for the tiles. In fact this is what they are made of.

    The Space Shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) is the barrier that protects the Space Shuttle Orbiter during the searing 1650 C (3000 F) heat of atmospheric reentry. A secondary goal is to protect from the heat and cold of space while on orbit.[1] The TPS covers essentially the entire orbiter surface, and consists of seven different materials in varying locations based on amount of required heat protection:

    • Reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC), used in the nose cap and wing leading edges. Used where reentry temperature exceeds 1260 C (2300 F).
    • High-temperature reusable surface insulation (HRSI) tiles, used on the orbiter underside. Made of coated LI-900 Silica ceramics. Used where reentry temperature is below 1260 C.
    • Fibrous refractory composite insulation (FRCI) tiles, used to provide improved strength, durability, resistance to coating cracking and weight reduction. Some HRSI tiles were replaced by this type.
    • Flexible Insulation Blankets (FIB), a quilted, flexible blanket-like surface insulation. Used where reentry temperature is below 649 C (1200 F).
    • Low-temperature Reusable Surface Insulation (LRSI) tiles, formerly used on the upper fuselage, but now mostly replaced by FIB. Used in temperature ranges roughly similar to FIB.
    • Toughened unipiece fibrous insulation (TUFI) tiles, a stronger, tougher tile which came into use in 1996. Used in high and low temperature areas.
    • Felt reusable surface insulation (FRSI). White Nomex felt blankets on the upper payload bay doors, portions of the midfuselage and aft fuselage sides, portions of the upper wing surface and a portion of the OMS/RCS pods. Used where temperatures stay below 371 C (700 F).
    Some people live long, meaningful lives.

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  6. #31
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  7. #32
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 600whp S4 Click here to enlarge
    Also they use it for the brakes on the space shuttle and internal structure pieces in the raft as well
    Yes the shuttle did have beryllium brakes, but not thermal tiles.
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  8. #33
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    That is an informative document, but it does not say anywhere that the thermal tiles were beryllium. It is not a very good thermal insulator.

    It has other good properties that were used for framing, retainers and spacers in structural application, but not a thermal insulator.
    Some people live long, meaningful lives.

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  9. #34
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 600whp S4 Click here to enlarge
    NO im 100% positive the tiles are beryllium. Back in the 90s now they are a hybrid material with small amounts of beryllium in them. the melting point of beryllium is 1278c
    Well since you edited your post, OK.

    The melting point of beryllium is 1278C, correct. But the surface of the shuttle gets to over 3000F which turn that metal into liquid. You originally said the tiles were beryllium, now you mean they use it as additives? I'll buy that.

    But sure as hell not solid beryllium, the tiles have to be a refractory, only very few metals can withstand those temperatures.

    They did use beryllium for the mercury mission as a non-ablative shield but it didnt last very long and they moved on to refractory materials instead.
    Last edited by DBFIU; 12-27-2010 at 06:13 PM.
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  10. #35
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    All I know is if my car had materials used on the space shuttle I would feel pretty good. Like I'm driving a car from the future. I need something made out of beryllium.

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    2 out of 2 members liked this post. Reputation: Yes | No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by SlicktopTTZ Click here to enlarge
    Either way it is awesome. I wonder what the real limit of the 4g63 block is.....

    700 AWHP, after that yo need to "hard block" it to keep the cylinder walls round or prevent cracking.
    the 4g64 is a stronger alternative.....

  12. #37
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    wow that's an incredible build, custum everything x.x
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  13. #38
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    withstands 100 psi. that is incredible. the size of the turbo the thought the mapping the engineering the everything. i'm just amazed.
    Burger Motorsports
    Home of the Worlds fastest N20s, N54s, N55s, S55s, N63s, and S63s!

    It is the sole responsibility of the purchaser and installer of any BMS part to employ the correct installation techniques required to ensure the proper operation of BMS parts, and BMS disclaims any and all liability for any part failure due to improper installation or use. It is the sole responsibility of the customer to verify that the use of their vehicle and items purchased comply with federal, state and local regulations. BMS claims no legal federal, state or local certification concerning pollution controlled motor vehicles or mandated emissions requirements. BMS products labeled for use only in competition racing vehicles may only be used on competition racing vehicles operated exclusively on a closed course in conjunction with a sanctioned racing event, in accordance with all federal and state laws, and may never be operated on public roads/highways. Please click here for more information on legal requirements related to use of BMS parts.

  14. #39
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by black e Click here to enlarge
    700 AWHP, after that yo need to "hard block" it to keep the cylinder walls round or prevent cracking.
    the 4g64 is a stronger alternative.....
    When you say "hard block" do you mean fill up the water passages?

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    1 out of 1 members liked this post. Reputation: Yes | No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by SlicktopTTZ Click here to enlarge
    When you say "hard block" do you mean fill up the water passages?

    yes, concrete!

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