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  1. #1
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    High Pressure AC hose leak

    I recently found out my AC is not blowing cold air anymore, even-though the compressor turns on. After a bit of poking under the hood I found out that my high pressure hose P/N 64539239768 is leaking. I was actually able to put a little bit of pressure with my fingers on it and change the pitch of the hissing sound as I was doing it. At this point all my refrigerant is gone and I really want to replace this hose and get my AC back before summer. Does anyone here know what is involved in replacing it? Some search in forums provided with insights on changing the compressor but I could not find any information regarding the replacement of this hose only. I guess it is not a common failure?

    Any help is appreciated.
    Click here to enlarge

  2. #2
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    Bump to help him

    Stage 2 or 2.5 E9X M3 S65 V8 supercharger kit for sale
    : http://www.boostaddict.com/showthrea...r-kit-for-sale

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    It's difficult to tell just from looking at realoem, but the condensor side looks accessable by removing FMIC and RAD. Removing those items may give you more access to the upper side of the compressor, but the compressor may need to be removed to access the house mounting location. Hard to tell without looking directly at my engine bay. http://www.realoem.com/bmw/showparts...=64&fg=60&hl=3

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    I think what I'll end up doing is removing the filter box and intake tubing, maybe even FMIC. The more I look at it the more I wonder if it is really the hose I think it is or P/N 64509163320. I guess the only way to tell is to rip things out.
    Also, I found out that there is common issue with P/N
    64509163320 rubbing against the FMIC t-clamp (stainless steel) and developing a pin hole as a result...

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    2 out of 2 members liked this post. Yes Reputation No
    I thought I'd update the thread - I fixed the AC and sure enough it turned out that the high side hose (superseded by P/N 64539239768) had developed a pinhole from rubbing against a stainless steel t-clamp. For people experiencing complete loss of cooling capacity I'd recommend checking the system for pressure. If the system appears to be evacuated or nearly evacuated then it is very likely that the above mentioned hose is the issue. Here is what is involved in addressing the problem:

    • Remove the fan
    • Remove the air filter box (assuming you still have it)
    • The hose is connected to the condenser and the compressor. It is fasten on both points with a single screw (hex but I don't quite remember the size). Undo the screws and gently pry the hose loose. The hose is also secured with plastic brackets (count of 2) - unclip and maneuver out of the engine compartment.
    • Care must be taken to prevent any dirt getting to the condenser and compressor points as this will affect the o-ring seals.
    • Lubricate the o-rings on the replacement hose (use some compressor oil) and install the same way It was removed.
    • Reassemble everything back together.
    • Pull vacuum for an hour or two and check for leaks with vacuum gauge.
    • If there is no leak then pull vacuum for 10 more hours (if you have the patience) and fill 20.8 +/-0.4 oz R134a with the compressor on, temperature control set to minimum and windows completely opened.
    • When filled up to spec the air blowing out of the vent will be around 55-60F with the car stationary in a hot day (92F when I did it). When in motion, the air temperature should drop to 44F – 45F.


    Another thing worth mentioning would the drier insert. If your system has been opened for more than a day or the compressor has been run for extended period of time with the hose broken then your drier insert (part of the condenser) is more than likely saturated. If this is the case, then you’ll need to replace it and add oil to the system unless you want to replace the compressor relatively soon…Click here to enlarge Adding oil to the system is tricky though – too little and the compressor wears out prematurely; too much and the compressor goes almost immediately. I’d rather have a reputable AC shop take care of this sort of mess. If you pulled vacuum for 12+ hours, it is quite likely that most of the moisture has boiled off the system, but it is still preferable for the drier insert to be replaced.
    Anyways, I am glad my AC is now working as I would have boiled in my own sauce tomorrow at 100F…Click here to enlarge

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    Good deal:-):-) I just has my done too
    - Proven Power Tampa built 6466 ST -
    - N54 6AT WR 711whp 637wtq-
    -N54 WR 1/4mile trap: 133.57mph- -

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