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  1. #1
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    Differences in Ford Modular Engines

    Ok maybe not as hard to find as i thought....

    4.6L & 5.4L Engine Specs

    Ford Modular Engine Family Specifications

    Click here to enlargeThe 4.6L & 5.4L V-8 engines are part of Ford's Modular overhead camshaft engine family, as is the 6.8L V-10 optional in 3/4 & 1 ton Ford trucks through 2010. The 4.6L & 5.4L become optional V-8 powerplants in the Ford F-150 for the 1997 model year. The term "Modular" refers to the ability of the engine production facility to rapidly change its tooling to produce different versions of the engine, and does not refer to the fact that the engines share many components. Though the architecture of the 4.6L & 5.4L is very similar, the 5.4L features a longer stroke and therefore requires a taller deck height than that of the 4.6L. The 5.4L utilizes a small bore, long stroke design, while the 4.6L utilizes a nearly square design (approx. 1:1 bore to stroke ratio). The engines have earned an overwhelming reputation of reliability and become a popular engine amongst long term Ford F-150 owners. Both engines have been featured on Ward's 10 Best Engines List on multiple occasions, and received a variety of honorable mentions from various industry analysts. The "Triton V-8" title has been used to label the modular engines in Ford F-150s since 1997.

    4.6L V-8 Specs

    Engine: 4.6L 24v SOHC or 32v SOHC V-8
    Production Plants: - Romeo Engine Plant in Romeo, Michigan
    - Windsor Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario
    - Essex Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario
    Displacement: 4.6 liters, 281 cubic inches
    Block Material: Cast iron
    Cylinder Head Material: Aluminum
    Firing Order: 1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8
    Bore: 3.55 inches
    Stroke: 3.55 inches
    Deck Height: 8.937 inches
    Compression Ratio: 9.4 : 1 (2v)
    9.8 : 1 (3v)
    Valvetrain: Single overhead camshaft, available in 16 valve (2 valves per cylinder) or 24 valve (3 valves per cylinder). Ford also built a high performance 32 valve 4.6L, but it was never used offered in the Ford F-150.
    Fuel System: Electronic, sequential multiport fuel injection
    Oil Capacity: 6 quarts w/ filter
    Horsepower: 220 hp @ 4,750 rpm (F-150 2v, 1997)
    292 hp @ 5,700 rpm (F-150 3v, 2010)
    Torque: 265 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm (F-150 2v, 1997)
    320 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm (F-150 3v, 2010)
    Applications: Ford F-150, Ford cars (including Mustang),Ford Expedition


    5.4L V-8 Specs

    Engine: 5.4L 16v SOHC or 24v SOHC V-8
    Production Plants: - 2v produced at Windsor Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario
    - 3v produced at Essex Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario
    Displacement: 5.4 liters, 330 cubic inches
    Block Material: Cast iron
    Cylinder Head Material: Aluminum
    Firing Order: 1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8
    Bore: 3.55 inches
    Stroke: 4.17 inches
    Deck Height: 10.079 inches
    Compression Ratio: 9.8 : 1
    Valvetrain: Single overhead camshaft, available in 16 valve (2 valves per cylinder) or 24 valve (3 valves per cylinder). Ford also built a high performance 32 valve 5.4L, but it was never used offered in the Ford F-150.
    Fuel System: Electronic, sequential multiport fuel injection
    Oil Capacity: 6 quarts w/filter
    Horsepower: 235 hp @ 4,250 rpm (1997 2v ratings)
    310 hp @ 5,000 rpm (2010 3v ratings)
    Torque: 335 lb-ft @ 3,000 rpm (1997 2v ratings)
    365 lb-ft @ 3,500 rpm (2010 3v ratings)
    Applications: Ford F series, Expedition, E series, (high performance 4v used in Shelby Mustang and Ford GT)

    5.4L & 4.6L V-8 Power Output Timeline

    Timeline represents the horsepower & torque of the 4.6L & 5.4L V-8 when equipped in the Ford F-150 only.
    Model Year 4.6L V-8 5.4L V-8
    Notes
    1997 - 1998 220 hp @ 4,750 rpm
    265 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm
    235 hp @ 4,250 rpm
    335 lb-ft @ 3,000 rpm
    1999 - 2000 220 hp @ 4,750 rpm
    265 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm
    260 hp @ 4,500 rpm
    350 lb-ft @ 2,500 rpm
    2001 - 2003 231 hp @ 4,750 rpm
    293 lb-ft @ 3,500 rpm
    260 hp @ 4,500 rpm
    350 lb-ft @ 2,500 rpm
    2004 -2007 231 hp @ 4,750 rpm
    293 lb-ft @ 3,500 rpm
    300 hp @ 5,000 rpm
    365 lb-ft @ 3,750 rpm
    5.4L 24v (3v per cylinder) is introduced.
    2008 248 hp @ 4,750 rpm
    294 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm
    300 hp @ 5,000 rpm
    365 lb-ft @ 3,750 rpm
    2009 292 hp @ 5,700 rpm
    320 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm
    310 hp @ 5,000 rpm
    365 lb0ft @ 3,750 rpm
    4.6L 24v (3v per cylinder) is introduced.
    2010 292 hp @ 5,700 rpm
    320 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm
    310 hp @ 5,000 rpm
    365 lb-ft @ 3,500 rpm


    Common 4.6L & 5.4L Engine Issues

    Spark plugs stripping cylinder heads: 1997 - 2008 modular engines have a history of stripping the threads for the spark plugs in the cylinder head. The cylinder heads are made of aluminum, a much softer metal than steel, and the spark plugs are only held in place my a few threads. This combination makes it easy to strip the cylinder head during spark plug removal or replacement. Additionally, it is not uncommon for a spark plug to blow out, stripping the heads. This defect is acknowledged by Ford Motor Company as multiple TSB's (technical service bulletin) relate to this issue. A threaded insert is the recommended repair method, & Ford provides a tool kit specifc to this repair procedure.
    Composite intake manifold cracking: 1996 - 2001 Ford 4.6L & 5.4L engines a nylon composite intake manifold produced by DuPont. The intake manifold is prone to cracking, which results in coolant leakage. Ford began installing a revised intake manifold late in the 2001 model year to prevent this issue. A class action lawsuit was filed in behalf of Ford owners and later settled. Owners of problematic model year cars & trucks were elegible to receive an updated intake manifold within 90 days of the settlement.


    5.0L V8 Specs

    Ford's 5.0L Coyote V-8

    Click here to enlargeThe 5.0L "Coyote Motor" V-8 engine is Ford's latest variant in their modular engine family. It replaces the 4.6L & 5.4L V-8 options in the Ford F-150. As part of the modular engine family, the 5.0L is manufactured using existing modular engine production tooling at the Essex Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario. Despite its relatively high compression ratio, the 5.0L is designed to run safely on 87 octane regular unleaded gasoline. The most notable feature of the engine is the Ti-VCT DOHC, which allows for independent variable camshaft timing. Inspiration for the engine was drawn from Ford's 5.0L V-8 Coyote Indy racing engine, (an icon of Ford's racing experience on display in Dearborn, Michigan) which gave the engine its unique nickname. Ford engineers also paid close attention to Ford Racing's 5.0L "Cammer" crate engine when designing the engine.

    Ford 5.0L DOHC V8 Specs

    Engine: 5.0L 32 valve DOHC V8
    Production Plant: Essex engine plant in Windsor, Ontario
    Displacement: 5.0 liters, 302 cubic inches
    Block Material: Aluminum
    Cylinder Head Material: Aluminum
    Bore: 3.63 inches
    Stroke: 3.65 inches
    Deck Height: 8.937 inches
    Compression Ratio: 10.5 : 1 (11.0 : 1 in Ford Mustang)
    Firing Order: 1-5-4-8-6-3-7-2
    Valvetrain: Ti-VCT - Cam torque actuated twin independent variable camshaft timing, dual overhead cam (DOHC), 32 valve (4 valves per cylinder).
    Fuel System: Fuel injected, sequential multi port injection, electronically controlled
    Horsepower: 360 hp @ 5,500 rpm (up tp 412 hp in Mustang)
    Torque: 380 lb-ft @ 4,250 rpm (up to 390 lb-ft in Mustang)
    Applications: Ford F-150, Ford Mustang

    5.0L V8 Features

    A higher compression version of the 5.0L is found in the Ford Mustang, boosting power ratings as high as 412 hp and 390 lb-ft of torque.
    Piston cooling jets provide additional heat protection and piston longevity.
    5.0L V8 features a forged steel crankshaft and cross bolted mains for strength.
    Oil cooler and deep sump oil pan give the 5.0L 10,000 mile oil change intervals.
    The intake ports of the 5.0L outflow Ford GT heads.
    Powder metal connecting rods, forged crankshaft, hypereutectic pistons.
    Ford engineers put a significant amount of effort into NVH (noise, vibration, harshness) control when designing the new 5.0L.


    Ford 6.2L V-8

    6.2L V-8 Engine Specs

    Ford's 6.2L V-8 went into production in 2010 as a high performance option for the Ford F-150 SVT Raptor. The 6.2L is the latest engine variant in Ford's Boss family. For the 2011 model year, the 6.2L replaced the 6.8L Triton V-10 in Ford Super Duty (F-250, F-350) trucks, though the Super Duty version is tuned for lower performance than the Raptor variant. For 2011 model years, the engine was made available for all F150 models, not just the SVT Raptor, making it the highest performing engine in the F-150's engine lineup.
    Ford 6.2L V-8 Specs

    Engine: 6.2L 2v SOHC V8
    Displacement: 6.2 liters, 379 cubic inches
    Block Material: Cast iron
    Cylinder Head Material: Aluminum
    Bore: 4.02 inches
    Stroke: 3.74 inches
    Compression Ratio: 9.8 : 1
    Valvetrain: SOHC (single overhead cam), VCT (variable camshaft timing), roller rocker shaft, 2 valves per cylinder
    Fuel System: Fuel injected, sequential multi port injection, electronically controlled
    Horsepower: 411 hp @ 5,500 rpm (385 hp in Super Duty)
    Torque: 434 lb-ft @ 4,500 rpm (405 lb-ft in Super Duty)
    Applications: Ford F-150 Raptor SVT, F-250/F-350

    Additional 6.2L V-8 Information

    Large bore, small stroke design inspired by Ford's racing heritage.
    2 spark plugs per cylinder ensures optimal performance and fuel efficiency.
    Piston cooling jets keep piston crowns cool in even the most extreme scenarios.
    Durability testing of the 6.2L V8 included test running multiple engines at peak power for 500 hours, non-stop, as well as multiple 1000 hour, high load, real-world driving tests. Durability testing put the engines in extreme conditions far greater than customers are expected to experience.
    The 6.2L V8 is able to run on E85 or lower fuel blends.

    Click here to enlarge Click here to enlarge Click here to enlarge

    "We need to upgrade your skill before we upgrade your horsepower"

    -Tommy to Josh

  2. #2
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    1 out of 1 members liked this post. Reputation: Yes | No
    @Sticky

    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ultimateendz Click here to enlarge
    Ok maybe not as hard to find as i thought....

    4.6L & 5.4L Engine Specs

    Ford Modular Engine Family Specifications

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...arengine-1.pngThe 4.6L & 5.4L V-8 engines are part of Ford's Modular overhead camshaft engine family, as is the 6.8L V-10 optional in 3/4 & 1 ton Ford trucks through 2010. The 4.6L & 5.4L become optional V-8 powerplants in the Ford F-150 for the 1997 model year. The term "Modular" refers to the ability of the engine production facility to rapidly change its tooling to produce different versions of the engine, and does not refer to the fact that the engines share many components. Though the architecture of the 4.6L & 5.4L is very similar, the 5.4L features a longer stroke and therefore requires a taller deck height than that of the 4.6L. The 5.4L utilizes a small bore, long stroke design, while the 4.6L utilizes a nearly square design (approx. 1:1 bore to stroke ratio). The engines have earned an overwhelming reputation of reliability and become a popular engine amongst long term Ford F-150 owners. Both engines have been featured on Ward's 10 Best Engines List on multiple occasions, and received a variety of honorable mentions from various industry analysts. The "Triton V-8" title has been used to label the modular engines in Ford F-150s since 1997.

    4.6L V-8 Specs

    Engine: 4.6L 24v SOHC or 32v SOHC V-8
    Production Plants: - Romeo Engine Plant in Romeo, Michigan
    - Windsor Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario
    - Essex Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario
    Displacement: 4.6 liters, 281 cubic inches
    Block Material: Cast iron
    Cylinder Head Material: Aluminum
    Firing Order: 1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8
    Bore: 3.55 inches
    Stroke: 3.55 inches
    Deck Height: 8.937 inches
    Compression Ratio: 9.4 : 1 (2v)
    9.8 : 1 (3v)
    Valvetrain: Single overhead camshaft, available in 16 valve (2 valves per cylinder) or 24 valve (3 valves per cylinder). Ford also built a high performance 32 valve 4.6L, but it was never used offered in the Ford F-150.
    Fuel System: Electronic, sequential multiport fuel injection
    Oil Capacity: 6 quarts w/ filter
    Horsepower: 220 hp @ 4,750 rpm (F-150 2v, 1997)
    292 hp @ 5,700 rpm (F-150 3v, 2010)
    Torque: 265 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm (F-150 2v, 1997)
    320 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm (F-150 3v, 2010)
    Applications: Ford F-150, Ford cars (including Mustang),Ford Expedition


    5.4L V-8 Specs

    Engine: 5.4L 16v SOHC or 24v SOHC V-8
    Production Plants: - 2v produced at Windsor Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario
    - 3v produced at Essex Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario
    Displacement: 5.4 liters, 330 cubic inches
    Block Material: Cast iron
    Cylinder Head Material: Aluminum
    Firing Order: 1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8
    Bore: 3.55 inches
    Stroke: 4.17 inches
    Deck Height: 10.079 inches
    Compression Ratio: 9.8 : 1
    Valvetrain: Single overhead camshaft, available in 16 valve (2 valves per cylinder) or 24 valve (3 valves per cylinder). Ford also built a high performance 32 valve 5.4L, but it was never used offered in the Ford F-150.
    Fuel System: Electronic, sequential multiport fuel injection
    Oil Capacity: 6 quarts w/filter
    Horsepower: 235 hp @ 4,250 rpm (1997 2v ratings)
    310 hp @ 5,000 rpm (2010 3v ratings)
    Torque: 335 lb-ft @ 3,000 rpm (1997 2v ratings)
    365 lb-ft @ 3,500 rpm (2010 3v ratings)
    Applications: Ford F series, Expedition, E series, (high performance 4v used in Shelby Mustang and Ford GT)

    5.4L & 4.6L V-8 Power Output Timeline

    Timeline represents the horsepower & torque of the 4.6L & 5.4L V-8 when equipped in the Ford F-150 only.
    Model Year 4.6L V-8 5.4L V-8
    Notes
    1997 - 1998 220 hp @ 4,750 rpm
    265 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm
    235 hp @ 4,250 rpm
    335 lb-ft @ 3,000 rpm
    1999 - 2000 220 hp @ 4,750 rpm
    265 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm
    260 hp @ 4,500 rpm
    350 lb-ft @ 2,500 rpm
    2001 - 2003 231 hp @ 4,750 rpm
    293 lb-ft @ 3,500 rpm
    260 hp @ 4,500 rpm
    350 lb-ft @ 2,500 rpm
    2004 -2007 231 hp @ 4,750 rpm
    293 lb-ft @ 3,500 rpm
    300 hp @ 5,000 rpm
    365 lb-ft @ 3,750 rpm
    5.4L 24v (3v per cylinder) is introduced.
    2008 248 hp @ 4,750 rpm
    294 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm
    300 hp @ 5,000 rpm
    365 lb-ft @ 3,750 rpm
    2009 292 hp @ 5,700 rpm
    320 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm
    310 hp @ 5,000 rpm
    365 lb0ft @ 3,750 rpm
    4.6L 24v (3v per cylinder) is introduced.
    2010 292 hp @ 5,700 rpm
    320 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm
    310 hp @ 5,000 rpm
    365 lb-ft @ 3,500 rpm


    Common 4.6L & 5.4L Engine Issues

    • Spark plugs stripping cylinder heads: 1997 - 2008 modular engines have a history of stripping the threads for the spark plugs in the cylinder head. The cylinder heads are made of aluminum, a much softer metal than steel, and the spark plugs are only held in place my a few threads. This combination makes it easy to strip the cylinder head during spark plug removal or replacement. Additionally, it is not uncommon for a spark plug to blow out, stripping the heads. This defect is acknowledged by Ford Motor Company as multiple TSB's (technical service bulletin) relate to this issue. A threaded insert is the recommended repair method, & Ford provides a tool kit specifc to this repair procedure.
    • Composite intake manifold cracking: 1996 - 2001 Ford 4.6L & 5.4L engines a nylon composite intake manifold produced by DuPont. The intake manifold is prone to cracking, which results in coolant leakage. Ford began installing a revised intake manifold late in the 2001 model year to prevent this issue. A class action lawsuit was filed in behalf of Ford owners and later settled. Owners of problematic model year cars & trucks were elegible to receive an updated intake manifold within 90 days of the settlement.


    5.0L V8 Specs

    Ford's 5.0L Coyote V-8

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...0Lcoyote-1.pngThe 5.0L "Coyote Motor" V-8 engine is Ford's latest variant in their modular engine family. It replaces the 4.6L & 5.4L V-8 options in the Ford F-150. As part of the modular engine family, the 5.0L is manufactured using existing modular engine production tooling at the Essex Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario. Despite its relatively high compression ratio, the 5.0L is designed to run safely on 87 octane regular unleaded gasoline. The most notable feature of the engine is the Ti-VCT DOHC, which allows for independent variable camshaft timing. Inspiration for the engine was drawn from Ford's 5.0L V-8 Coyote Indy racing engine, (an icon of Ford's racing experience on display in Dearborn, Michigan) which gave the engine its unique nickname. Ford engineers also paid close attention to Ford Racing's 5.0L "Cammer" crate engine when designing the engine.

    Ford 5.0L DOHC V8 Specs

    Engine: 5.0L 32 valve DOHC V8
    Production Plant: Essex engine plant in Windsor, Ontario
    Displacement: 5.0 liters, 302 cubic inches
    Block Material: Aluminum
    Cylinder Head Material: Aluminum
    Bore: 3.63 inches
    Stroke: 3.65 inches
    Deck Height: 8.937 inches
    Compression Ratio: 10.5 : 1 (11.0 : 1 in Ford Mustang)
    Firing Order: 1-5-4-8-6-3-7-2
    Valvetrain: Ti-VCT - Cam torque actuated twin independent variable camshaft timing, dual overhead cam (DOHC), 32 valve (4 valves per cylinder).
    Fuel System: Fuel injected, sequential multi port injection, electronically controlled
    Horsepower: 360 hp @ 5,500 rpm (up tp 412 hp in Mustang)
    Torque: 380 lb-ft @ 4,250 rpm (up to 390 lb-ft in Mustang)
    Applications: Ford F-150, Ford Mustang

    5.0L V8 Features

    • A higher compression version of the 5.0L is found in the Ford Mustang, boosting power ratings as high as 412 hp and 390 lb-ft of torque.
    • Piston cooling jets provide additional heat protection and piston longevity.
    • 5.0L V8 features a forged steel crankshaft and cross bolted mains for strength.
    • Oil cooler and deep sump oil pan give the 5.0L 10,000 mile oil change intervals.
    • The intake ports of the 5.0L outflow Ford GT heads.
    • Powder metal connecting rods, forged crankshaft, hypereutectic pistons.
    • Ford engineers put a significant amount of effort into NVH (noise, vibration, harshness) control when designing the new 5.0L.


    Ford 6.2L V-8

    6.2L V-8 Engine Specs

    Ford's 6.2L V-8 went into production in 2010 as a high performance option for the Ford F-150 SVT Raptor. The 6.2L is the latest engine variant in Ford's Boss family. For the 2011 model year, the 6.2L replaced the 6.8L Triton V-10 in Ford Super Duty (F-250, F-350) trucks, though the Super Duty version is tuned for lower performance than the Raptor variant. For 2011 model years, the engine was made available for all F150 models, not just the SVT Raptor, making it the highest performing engine in the F-150's engine lineup.
    Ford 6.2L V-8 Specs

    Engine: 6.2L 2v SOHC V8
    Displacement: 6.2 liters, 379 cubic inches
    Block Material: Cast iron
    Cylinder Head Material: Aluminum
    Bore: 4.02 inches
    Stroke: 3.74 inches
    Compression Ratio: 9.8 : 1
    Valvetrain: SOHC (single overhead cam), VCT (variable camshaft timing), roller rocker shaft, 2 valves per cylinder
    Fuel System: Fuel injected, sequential multi port injection, electronically controlled
    Horsepower: 411 hp @ 5,500 rpm (385 hp in Super Duty)
    Torque: 434 lb-ft @ 4,500 rpm (405 lb-ft in Super Duty)
    Applications: Ford F-150 Raptor SVT, F-250/F-350

    Additional 6.2L V-8 Information

    • Large bore, small stroke design inspired by Ford's racing heritage.
    • 2 spark plugs per cylinder ensures optimal performance and fuel efficiency.
    • Piston cooling jets keep piston crowns cool in even the most extreme scenarios.
    • Durability testing of the 6.2L V8 included test running multiple engines at peak power for 500 hours, non-stop, as well as multiple 1000 hour, high load, real-world driving tests. Durability testing put the engines in extreme conditions far greater than customers are expected to experience.
    • The 6.2L V8 is able to run on E85 or lower fuel blends.


    "We need to upgrade your skill before we upgrade your horsepower"

    -Tommy to Josh

  3. #3
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    This is good, very good! Thanks.

  4. #4
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    Missing all the Cobra motors from the 96-98, 99, 01 and 03-04 motors.

    I belive 96-98 motors made 305hp and the 99 & 01 motors made 320hp and of course the underrated Terminator motors made uh hmm 390hp at the crank.
    We stay swingin...
    Click here to enlarge

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